Jarrod’s Weekly Comics

I was a little late in picking up my comics this week, but anyways, here they are!

Action Comics #883, The Amazing Spider-Man #611, The Anchor #2, Batgirl #4, Batman #693, and Batman and Robin #6.
Batman and Robin #6 Variant, Batman Doc Savage Special One-Shot, Green Lantern Corps #42, Daredevil #502, Dark X-Men #1 of 5, and Realm of Kings: Imperial Guard #1 of 5.
Batman and Robin #6 Variant, Batman Doc Savage Special One-Shot, Green Lantern Corps #42, Daredevil #502, Dark X-Men #1 of 5, and Realm of Kings: Imperial Guard #1 of 5.
Red Robin #6, Strange #1 of 4, and The Unwritten #7.
Red Robin #6, Strange #1 of 4, and The Unwritten #7.
Luna Park original graphic novel.
Luna Park original graphic novel.

2 thoughts on “Jarrod’s Weekly Comics”

  1. Luna Park’s cover looks interesting. What’s this about exactly?

    BTW…you really should “port” some of the discussions and impressions you guys have on that huge-ass comic thread into here. Try encouraging Tim and Steven to get things moving, too.

  2. I’ve been telling the guys to write some stuff here, but no luck. As for impressions, it’s tough because I don’t want to spoil anything. I suppose I could write something for some of the books I’m really interested in.

    As for Luna Park, here’s the Amazon.com description”

    Taking a break (mostly) from his powerful and painstakingly constructed stories of historical New York in novels like Dreamland and Paradise Alley, Baker takes a welcome dive into the graphic novel field with this punchy and ghostly modern-day noir. The setting—today’s rusted and listless landscape of Coney Island—fits the dead-end daydreaming of his protagonist. Alik Streinikov is a former Russian soldier fleeing nightmares of the cruelties he witnessed in Chechnya and now working as an enforcer for a sideshow mob fragment that’s about to get pushed out by a more vicious gang. Alik’s already iffy toehold on society’s ladder is complicated by a serious drug habit and worse addiction to Marina, a hooker/fortune teller whose every card reads like bad news. Marina keeps reminding Alik of his nightmares, and before long he’s spiraling through alternative pasts (from early 20th-century New York to the Russian civil war), which repeat the same inescapable tragedies. The artwork by Zezelj (Northlanders) has a windswept, slashing quality to it that captures Coney Island’s bitter, salty ocean air on the page. A tough-nosed crime story redolent with magic and sadness, Luna Park serves as a fine showcase for two great artists working to the best of their abilities.

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