Tag Archives: Crossed Swords II

Crossed Swords II Review

Crosswed Swords II ReviewCrossed Swords II (Available on Neo Geo MVS, AES, and CD)
ESRB Rating: N/A
Number of Players: 1 to 2
Genre: Action
Publisher: SNK
Developer: ADK
Release Date: May 2nd, 1995 (Original CD version), August 28th, 2015 (AES and MVS versions)

Parent Talk: This is an independent release of a Neo Geo game from 1995 that has been converted from the Neo Geo CD to the Neo Geo MVS and AES. It features a wire-frame character facing off against countless mystical enemies. While there are depictions of violence and blood, it really isn’t damaging for children to play the game. In fact this is exactly the sort of game I would have played in the arcades when I was younger, and I turned out just fine…ok that’s debatable, but honestly it’s perfectly suitable for E10+, even though the ESRB didn’t rate the game.

Plays Like: If you’ve played the original Crossed Swords you know what to expect, and if not, why haven’t you? Players take on the role of a knight, a warrior, or a ninja and make their way through multiple levels of non-stop combat. Combat is special in that you have to defend and attack whenever your enemy has an opening. It’s a very defensive style game, which makes it highly addicting. There are multiple paths to take, and a progression system wrapped around an in-game shop where you can level up, purchase upgrades, and more.

Review Basis: Completed the game multiple times, and tried every possible route.

Crossed Swords II highlights just how amazing the Neo Geo community really is. The game was originally released exclusively on the Neo Geo CD, however has since been converted to the AES and MVS formats. The conversion was handled by the main man behind the infamous Neo Geo UniBIOS, Razoola. Together with Jeff Kurtz from NeoBitz, they converted the CD exclusive over to the MVS and AES in style. Let’s find out how it all turned out.

CS1The Great:

Not only is the conversion spot on, but thanks to NeoBitz’s involvement, the two released a full MVS kit including artwork, dip switch settings, and a mini marquee, as well as a full AES release including a Shockbox. This is exactly why the community is so incredible, because fine folks are willing to go the extra mile. The quality is absolutely top notch, and you would have no idea wasn’t an original cart from back in the day because of the sheer quality of the product. They both need to be commended for a job well done.

Instead of just converting the game over to the MVS/AES, Razoola did something extra, he fixed graphical and audio bugs, game glitches, and even some translational problems. In short, he went all out. While I don’t have access to a full list of improvements, he did specify that 33 Sound FX were added, and 53 Graphical fixes were made. I should mention that the original CD-soundtrack to Crossed Swords II was not transferred over, instead the music was ripped from the original version of Crossed Swords.

CS2The Good:

  • The storyline in Crossed Swords II is minimalistic, but gets the job done. Essentially the main baddie from the original game returns to wreak havoc on the country, and only you can stop him. Ok sure it’s nothing original, but it gives some context as to why you’re fighting all of these enemies.
  • Multiple playable characters! Unlike the original game you now access to the original knight, a female warrior, and a ninja. Each character has different stats, with the knight having the strongest physical attacks, and the highest defense stats, but also low magic and the lowest speed. That means his recovery isn’t great either. The female warrior has low attack and defense, but the highest speed and magic attacks, making her play style quite different. Finally the ninja has balanced speed, attack, and defense, but the lowest magic attack skills.
  • Multiplayer is vastly superior to the original game. This time each player has full access to the entire screen. In the original one player was stuck on the left portion of the screen, and the other player the right portion. Now both players can gang up on enemies, or quickly dash to the other side of the screen.

AES+ Jumping and dashing are fantastic additions. Both are extremely useful techniques to master early on. With the proper weapon a jump attack can be devastating to your enemy. The dash allows you to quickly cover ground, or get out of your enemy’s line of fire. You can also dash in at an enemy, strike, and then dash out.

  • The core gameplay is utterly fantastic. Enemies block repeatedly forcing you to wait for an opening before you attack. You have access to magical attacks and traditional attacks, but when coupled with the new jump and dash moves, you feel just powerful enough for the task at hand. Make no mistake about it, it’s not just the enemies that defend, you have to do the same as well if you want to survive. This defensive style gameplay is addictive and forces you to stay on your toes.
  • Branching paths extend replay value. Much like the original, you can select multiple paths to take, which change which bosses you will fight, and how you will progress through the game. You’ll have to play at least twice in order to get a true sense of what the game has to offer. There are also two different gameplay modes, one is the main story, and the second is a boss battle mode where you can challenge any of the bosses to learn their strategies, which also enhance the replay value.
  • MVS+ You can purchase new items and equipment from shops. That means you can save up and purchase that sword you’ve been eying, replenish your health and magic attacks, or even level up. That’s right, you level up at the shops, which adds an interesting elements of strategy to the game because you need to balance whether to improve your gear, or your vitality.

    • The graphics for the most part look very similar to those in the first game. There are a lot of recycled enemies with simple color palette swaps, but the sprites are massive, and feature great animations and color. The backgrounds also look very detailed and nice. The sound effects are fantastic, and the music, while taken from the original Crossed Swords, fits perfectly within the game.

    CS3The Lowdown:

    Crossed Swords II is an extremely fun game in its own right, and it is absolutely amazing being able to play this in a Neo cab, or on your home TV via the AES. Razoola and NeoBitz did two runs of the MVS version, and one run of the AES version, and sadly they’re completely sold out meaning if you like what you see in the video review, I’m afraid you’re out of luck. Maybe one day the game will be reprinted again, otherwise you may have to resort to purchasing it from the second hand market and good luck with that as prices will most likely be astronomically high. I tip my hat off to Razoola and Jeff for a job well done. This is hands down one of the best videogame products released in 2015.