Tag Archives: Nintendo 3DS

Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright Review

FEFire Emblem Fates: Birthright (Available Exclusively on the Nintendo 3DS)
ESRB Rating: T
Number of Players: 1 to 2
Genre: Strategy RPG
Publisher: Nintendo
Developer: Intelligent Systems
Release Date: February 19th, 2016

Parent Talk: The ESRB rates Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright T for teen because of animated blood, fantasy violence, and suggestive themes. I’ve personally been playing this series since the early 90’s, and it’s truly not a damaging game for young audiences. There is violence to be sure, but there’s no gore, and the violence is completely fantasy-based. Even the suggestive themes are mild at best.

Plays Like: The Fire Emblem series hasn’t changed very much in the twenty plus years its been around, it remains a strategy RPG at its very core, regardless of how many new gameplay mechanics are thrown into the mix. This means you move your characters around a grid-based map taking out enemy units. Each character class has pros and cons and by properly taking advantage of your units you can destroy your opponents.

Review Basis: I purchased the Special Edition at launch, and played through Birthright. To give myself an extra challenge I played on Normal, and on Classic. This means if a character dies, they’re dead for good, which has been a staple of the series since day one.

I’m a longtime fan of the Fire Emblem series, having started with the series back in 1990 when the original game hit the Famicom and all the way through to this very day. I always enjoyed the chess-like gameplay a strategy or tactical RPG has to offer. Fire Emblem Fates is especially special in that there are actually three different versions of the game out there, Conquest, Revelation, and Birthright. Today we’re going to be talking about Birthright, which is actually the easiest of the three games. So let’s jump in and see what makes this game tick.

FE2The Great:

I’m sure I will say the same thing for the other parts, but Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright is an incredible game to play. The gameplay is absolutely spot-on. You move your units across a grid-battlefield in order to successfully complete objectives. Each chapter has a specific objective, but unfortunately Birthright stumbles in this category, which I’ll discuss later on. The gameplay is where it’s at though. The legendary weapon triangle has returned although it’s slightly changed now. Swords and Magic have an advantage over Axes and Bows. Axes and Bows have an advantage over Lances and Hidden Weapons. Lances and Hidden Weapons have an advantage over Swords and Magic. To make things ultra-simple the triangle is also color-based, red has the advantage over green, green over blue, and blue over red.

As you level your units up, not only do they become more powerful, but they also learn skills such as counter attack. Each unit can hold a maximum of six skills. It’s also possible to change classes, of which there are many, if you happen to locate a specific class-changing item. Classes can also be advanced to a stronger class, for example a ninja can become a master ninja, and so on. The support system, first introduced in Fire Emblem: Binding Blade, which was unfortunately never released outside Japan, and is on the Game Boy Advance. Character build bonds based on whether they fight side-by-side with one another. Characters that form strong support for one another can use special items in order to change classes that reflect this bond. That’s nothing to mention the stronger characters support one another, the better they fight alongside each other. Then there’s the weapon system, which can change a very weak character into a powerhouse if they increase their weapon rank from E to S. There’s so much depth here it’s just incredible.

FE1The Good:

  • I really enjoyed the storyline in Birthright, and I can’t wait to jump back into the other two game and see all the differences. You play as Corrin, either a male or female, who lives in Nohr with her loving family. Her father, an absolute monster of a man, is hell-bent on the destruction of Hoshido, the neighboring kingdom. I really don’t want to spoil any of the storyline, but needless to say things are not as they appear, and after the sixth chapter the player has to make a very important choice, and this is ultimately what separates the three different versions of Fire Emblem Fates. Players have to decide if they stay with their family in Nohr, defend Hoshido, or decide to veer off on their own. If you purchase Birthright on its own, your choice is made for you, you will defend Hoshido, if you purchase Conquest, you’ll side with Nohr, and if you purchased the Special Edition and play Revelation, you will decide to stand on your own. Revelation is available as a downloadable game from the Nintendo eShop for those who weren’t lucky enough to snag the Special Edition. Whichever game you decide to pick, the story unfolds based on the choice you made during this pivotal moment.
  • The 3DS, much like the DS before it, is perfectly well suited for this genre. The bottom screen displays your projected battle outcomes and percentages of achieving a critical strike, as well as displaying the map and the location of all the units.

  • Units selection is fantastic allowing you to select between archer, cavalier, knight, paladin, ninja, monk, and countless others. Selecting which units to bring with you into battle is the key element in Fire Emblem because you have to balance all of the different gameplay elements I mentioned above. Do you bring in your most powerful units all the time, and let the others stay at a low level? Doing so could put you at a serious disadvantage later on when specific classes have advantages over your mighty few. Thankfully Birthright eases players into things by allowing them to scout for challenges, which essentially allows you to grind levels. It’s entirely possible to max out each unit to level 20, then use a Master Seal to promote said unit to their advanced class, think cavalier to knight, and then level that class to 20 and get another seal to boost it to 25. If you take the time to do this for each of your units you will be virtually unstoppable.

  • Outside combat you’ll spend a lot of your time customizing your castle. Not only will you decide where to play your armory, jail, and all manner of other buildings, but this is where you’ll develop bonds with the different characters. Eventually you can even marry and have children, which causes new events to take place throughout the game. While in your castle hub you can purchase accessories for all of your troops which gives them stat buffs, and you can even fortify your castle with powerful armaments. You can even purchase permanent stat boosts by making statues of each specific unit. All around there’s a wealth of things you can do while not in combat.

  • A great start for newcomers. There are three core difficulty settings you can choose from, Normal, Hard, and Lunatic, and these control the strength of the enemies you face. Then there’s the whole permadeath subject, which is what most people dislike about Fire Emblem as a whole. On classic, it’s enabled, meaning if a unit dies, they’re gone for the duration of the game. Casual brings fallen units back once the chapter is complete, and finally Phoenix mode brings them back after their next turn. This is by far the most forgiving mode to play the game on, but if you’re seriously stuck, by all means go ahead and give it a try in Phoenix mode.

  • DLC isn’t mandatory for any of the Fire Emblem Fates games, but it’s certainly worth it. Not only do you get to play through some great maps, have a chance to level some of your characters, but you also get access to some extremely rare weapons, which can make certain units almost god-like in power. There’s a mixture of free and paid DLC for those interested and it’s accessible through the standard ‘next battle’ menu upon leaving the castle.

The So-So:

+/- I didn’t find the intimate moments all that special, and to be honest they come across as cheesy more often than not. You’re supposed to use the microphone to blow away steam from another character’s face, or caress your lover’s face so they wake up, things like that. It just comes across as bizarre to me. Most of these scenes were censored compared to what you were able to do in the Japanese version.

+/- The dialogue can also be a bit cheesy. While the story itself is great, and there are moments where you will truly feel sorry for what happens, often times the dialogue gets in the way of some of the more romantic moments.

+/- While I love the story, I can’t help but notice there are plot holes absolutely everywhere, which I can’t go into detail about for fear of spoiling the game.

The Bad:

  • While I understand Birthright was designed for people just getting into the Fire Emblem series, I find it can leave a bad taste in your mouth because the mission variety just isn’t there. This entire game is essentially broken up into two segments, destroy all the enemies, and defeat the boss. There might be one or two extra objective types but in the 27 missions, virtually every single one was one of these two types and that ultimately gets repetitive.   I’m sure new players would have appreciated more diverse objectives.

FE3The Lowdown:

Fire Emblem was one of the pioneers of the strategy RPG genre, and it’s incredible that after 26 years the series is better than ever before. Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright is a great entry point for anyone looking to see what all the fuss is about, and for longtime veterans, it’s a great story to experience before you jump into the harder games. Having three games to play in this wonderful installment is a delight, and I can’t recommend the game enough. It’s worth buying a 3DS for it’s that good.

Final Score: 9.3/10

Pokémon Y Wonderlocke!! – Ep 3 “The Garden Maze”

In this episode, we manage to evolve our Scatterbug twice for it to reach the magnificient Vivillion form. We also finally get our exp share and battle a bunch of trainers and advance the story.

Pokémon Y Wonderlocke!! – Ep 1 “New Beginnings”

Steven begins a brand new series, almost like a Let’s Play where he attempts to play through Pokemon Y using the Wonderlocke Rules.  I’ve included a list of the rules below the video.

Wonderlocke Rules:

1- When a Pokémon faints, it is considered “dead” and cannot be used anymore. It has to be either released or stored in a specified PC Box titled “Cemetery”.

2- You can only capture the first Pokémon you find in every new area and nothing else. If it faints of flees, there are no second chances.

3- The captured Pokémon must be Wondertraded and cannot be used in battle. You can however use the Pokémon obtained from Wonder Trade.

4- If a Pokémon obtained from Wonder Trade is too overpowered or over-leveled, you have 1 of 2 choices. Store it and keep it for later or Wonder Trade it again until a more suitable Pokémon is obtained. This is a one time decision and cannot be reversed.

5- If you receive the same species of Pokémon twice, you may Wonder Trade it again until you get a Pokémon not previously obtained.

6- You must give a nickname to all of the Pokémon you catch, for the sake of forming stronger emotional bonds.

Shovel Knight Review

Shovel Knight ReviewShovel Knight (Available on 3DS, PC, and Wii U)
ESRB Rating: E
Number of Players: 1
Genre: Action Platformer
Publisher: Yacht Club Games
Developer: Yacht Club Games
Release Date: June 26th, 2014

Parent Talk: Shovel Knight has been rated E for everyone by the ESRB, and features mild fantasy violence. This has all the makings of a fantastic NES classic, meaning even your youngest children can play the game without fear of any damaging material. It’s hardcore platforming action at its best.

Plays Like: Imagine if Mega Man, Super Mario Bros. 3, and DuckTales had an NES offspring, and you’ve got yourself Shovel Knight. It borrows gameplay elements from all three of those classic titles, and yet still brings enough new and fresh ideas to the tables to keep things very, very interesting. It’s a must-play game.

Review Basis: I finished the PC version of the game in one sitting. Afterwards, I grabbed some food, and went right back to playing. I haven’t started the New Game+ mode yet, but oh yes, I sure will.

Here’s an interesting story for you. I told Steven, one of the other COE nutcases, about a new game I just discovered that was absolutely incredible, Astebreed for those that don’t know. He took a guess and said Shovel Knight, to which I replied ‘WTF is Shovel Knight’. After some swearing, belittling, and other obscenities, he said it was a new action platforming game that would be right up my alley. A quick Google search later and I realized what Shovel Knight was. It was a Kickstarter game that got funded last April, I vividly recall their pitch video. Why I never gave them money is beyond me, because it turns out not only is this my style of game, but it too has jumped into my top five games of 2014 thus far. If you enjoy the retro scene, or are just looking for a kick ass game, go download Shovel Knight right now.

SK2The Great:

Everything old is new again. Let’s face facts, the retro scene is on fire right now. Not only are countless indie developers releasing games that reminisce about the classic NES days, but the original carts themselves have exploded in value over the past five years. Just take a quick look at eBay and you’ll see that even SNES games are crazy expensive. I mean $50 for a loose cart of Super Metroid?!?! For real!

Enter Shovel Knight. Shovel Knight was developed by a start-up indie developer called Yacht Club Games, and after this masterpiece they’re not going to be an unknown company for long. Shovel Knight successfully combined level design and boss elements from Mega Man, the awesome pogo gameplay from DuckTales, the overworld from Super Mario Bros. 3, and towns from Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. It’s not just a combination of these elements that make Shovel Knight so great, it’s the fact that Yacht Club Games simply took inspiration from these classics, but developed their own unique style, flair, and game world. Everything about Shovel Knight screams classic NES, yet at the same time it feels fresh enough to stand on its own, and that’s what makes it such a wonderful experience.

SK1The Good:

+ A platformer with a story. The setup is simple, Shovel Knight and his partner in crime Shield Knight are separated, an evil Enchantress has restored a powerful tower, and there are eight robot masters…I mean eight henchmen that must be stopped in order to restore peace to the land.

+ Each of the eight Order of No Quarter feels like they were ripped directly from a Mega Man game. You have your underwater Treasure Knight, there’s the ice world boss Polar Knight, and more. I loved the throwback to Mega Man, and the fact that each boss and stage is so completely unique compared to the last only makes things that much better.

+ Boss fights aren’t scripted, which means while a certain boss might have access to five moves, how they attack you changes every time you fight them. I really enjoyed that as simple pattern recognition isn’t enough.

+ I already mentioned the overworld map system is taken directly from Super Mario Bros. 3, but I love how they’ve adapted it to fit this unique world. While Shovel Knight moves from one area to the next, occasionally minor boss fights will pop up, there will be gem areas that you can only traverse with a special power-up, and much, much more.

+ Core gameplay is simple, but completely spot-on. You can jump, attack, or perform a downward thrust with your shovel. Along the way you can gain access to secondary attacks which use little jars of magic. Think of it like the heart system from the vintage Castlevania games. You can eventually find relics that allow you to punch through rocks, shoot flames, and more.

+ Weapon and armor upgrades are more than just for show. You can purchase upgrades that allow you to activate a powerful swipe attack after two successful bounces off enemies or blocks, you can get a charge shot like Mega Man would use, or even a beam attack like the vintage Zelda games.

+ You earn gems and diamonds from digging up treasure, defeating enemies, and virtually everything else you can imagine. The more loot you have, the more you can upgrade your health, your magic container number, and more. Die though, and a portion of your loot appears in three flying bags. Taken from Diablo, the only way to get your stolen loot is to head back to where you died and collect it yourself.

+ New Game+ If you’re looking for a challenge, this is certainly the mode you’re going to want to play through. Finish the game, which take under six hours unless you want to explore everything. Once done you can restart the game with all your previous equipment, but prepare to get your ass handed to you.

+ Level design, character design, and the overall graphics are fantastic. The game looks as if it were ripped from the NES, and given the HD treatment. Not since Mega Man 9 and 10 has a retro game looked so good. The sound design is exactly the same, it sounds perfectly unique featuring catchy tunes, and great sound effects. Both come together perfectly to establish Shovel Knight as Yacht Club Games’ mascot moving forward. They’re going to have their work cut out for them to top this.

SK3The So-So:

+/- Perhaps the only negative thing I can say about Shovel Knight is that some of its replay factor just isn’t there. The levels are 100% linear, even though they do feature some hidden paths here and there. The design isn’t enough to warrant multiple play-throughs. Once you’ve completed the main story and New Game+ I’m not convinced you’ll want to return every year, but proof is in the pudding so only time will tell. All the NES classics that this game borrows gameplay elements from could easily be replayed over and over, and over again and if Shovel Knight is able to do the same then it will have earned its place in gaming history.

SK4The Lowdown:

Shovel Knight is the best Kickstarter released game I’ve played to date. Yes, I even enjoyed it more than Broken Age. There’s just something about these throwback games I love. Shovel Knight takes the best of what made the original classics so much fun to play, and spices things up just enough to make it feel unique. If you own a Wii U, 3DS, or a somewhat capable PC, I wholeheartedly recommend you purchase Shovel Knight. It’s retro gaming at its absolute finest.

Final Score: 9.5/10

Interview with Next Level Games’ Audio Director, Chad York

I’ve always been a huge admirer of Next Level Games and the minds behind their games, particularly from the music point of view. Mario Strikers: Charged hit the scene a few years ago, and its music went by unrecognized. I honestly think it has one of the most underrated soundtracks of all time. Thankfully, I managed to get in contact with the man behind the music of that game and a few other Nintendo flagships, Chad York. I’m thankful that he lent his time for me to interview him through Skype. It was more of a conversation really, an insightful one at that. For my first interview ever, it turned out rather well. Hope you enjoy!

Nintendo is DOOMED!!!

Let’s face facts, Nintendo isn’t doing so well right now.  There’s no possible way to spin their latest financials in any positive light, but does that mean all hope is lost?  Jarrod tries to answer that very question in his latest vlog.