Tag Archives: PlayStation 3

The Evil Within Review

Evil Within ReviewThe Evil Within (Available on PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: M
Number of Players: 1
Genre: Survival Horror
Publisher: Bethesda
Developer: Tango Gameworks
Release Date: October 14th, 2014

Parent Talk: The Evil Within is rated M for mature (ages 17+) because of blood, gore, intense violence, and strong language. Often the game feels like something you’d expect if you went to see the latest Saw movie. Yes ladies and gentlemen, this is one gruesome game. You can cut off the heads of your enemies, you can burn bodies, and so much more. If you’re even a little squeamish, this isn’t a game for you.

Plays Like: As any good survival horror game, The Evil Within forces players to use their surroundings intelligently, scavenge for supplies, and conserve ammo wherever possible. Some areas force stealth, while others are all out action segments. There’s a great balance of creepy moments, tense cutscenes, and fantastic combat in this third person extravaganza.

Review Basis: Completed the campaign.

When Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami left Capcom I was really saddened by the news. This was the man who gave us Resident Evil, Dino Crisis, and the much beloved Resident Evil 4 and RE Remake on the GameCube. He was also responsible for many other classic Capcom games, but those four set a certain pedigree that Capcom has yet to surpass in the survival horror genre. I had always hoped that maybe one day he would return to the Resident Evil universe and deliver another masterpiece, but when he left Capcom I knew that was never going to happen. Fast forward a short time later and he announced his new game studio, Tango Gameworks, were developing a brand new survival horror game. While it wasn’t Resident Evil, my expectations were extremely high. This is Shinji Mikami we’re talking about here! So was he able to strike gold, or has he been away from the genre for too long? Let’s find out.

The Great:

If I had to pick one aspect where The Evil Within really shines, it would have to be in its atmosphere and tension. While I never found myself sitting in a corner crying for mommy, that honor goes to Alien: Isolation, I did find the sense of tension to be at an all-time high for many parts of the game. The attention to detail in the environments and the settings are ultimately what do it. You always feel uneasy because while you know something is out there, you never know exactly where. The fact the game is a physiological thriller as much as it is an intense action game, only adds to the stress. This is a game where walls disappear before your eyes, where enemies can materialize out of thin air, and where you’re lost more so than you realize.

There’s one section that sums up The Evil Within perfectly, and it’s from fairly early on in the game. There’s a section where you have to pass through a short hallway where a series of hospital beds are lining both sides of the walls. The lights are mostly broken, except for one off in the distance that is flickering, so barely anything is illuminated. You can see there’s something slowly walking back and forth towards the exit. As you slowly make your way towards the enemy, you realize that all of the beds have bodies on them, there’s blood on the floor and ceiling, and you accidently hit something on a table in front of you. You spin the camera around to see that one enemy rushing towards you, so you pull out your gun, which only has three bullets left in it. You take the shot, killing the enemy, but suddenly you hear grumbling, and notice movement. Those bodies on the beds are all moving, and they’re all heading straight towards you!

The Good:

  • The combat system is rock solid. You can tell this is a Mikami-san game. While using the shotgun, sniper rifle, or handgun, you get a real sense of power. The problem is that ammo is so hard to come by. You want to make every shot count, and thankfully you can do just that because the controls are spot on. There’s also a stealth mechanic, where you can sneak up on unsuspecting enemies for an instant kill. The environments can also be used to your advantage, where you can lure enemies into bear traps, explosives, and more. What happens when all of these elements are thrust upon you, choice! There’s nothing like taking out a group of enemies with a well-placed explosive bolt from your crossbow when you only had one bolt left, or getting that perfect stealth kill when you were surrounded by enemies. It’s moments like these that make you feel like a bad ass, and that’s awesome.
  • Much like the Resident Evil remake on the Nintendo GameCube, The Evil Within features enemies that can resurrect themselves after they’ve been downed by the player. The old ‘burn the corpse’ mechanic from that legendary game returns here, and you’ll want to burn all the bodies you come upon, especially later on in the game. Not only does this give you peace of mind, but you also have the chance to gain additional supplies from the burnt corpses.
  • Simple crafting system. While you scour the environment for ammo and syringes to heal yourself, odds are you’ll also stumble onto several parts. These can be used to craft ammo for the Agony Crossbow. You can freeze, explode, electrocute, blind, or craft standard bolts. Not only can you find the parts, but if you dismantle traps you can gain additional crafting supplies. The catch here is that these environmental traps aren’t just there for you to get caught up on, but as I mentioned before you can lure enemies to them. What ends up happening is you start to balance the desire for more ammo for your crossbow, with an easier way to take down enemies. Again, it’s all about the choices you make.
  • Exploration is rewarded. Players who thoroughly explore the various stages will find green ooze which can be used for upgrading your abilities, from extending your health and stamina, to being able to hold more ammo. The progression system in place here is fantastic, and scales perfectly with the rest of the game so you never feel like you’re overpowered. You can also find small statues which, once broken, will reward a small key. These keys can be used to unlock special lockers which grant a wide assortment of awesome goodies.
  • Even though you’re well-armed, don’t expect for this to be a cake walk. You’re going to die, and often, because a simple miscalculation can cause your head to roll. If you want to use stealth, be extremely careful what you bump into. If you want to use more straightforward action, make sure those headshots hit their mark or you’ll find yourself completely surrounded with no ammo to speak of.
  • Speaking of the difficulty, the boss fights are just crazy. Most of these consist of creatures that can down you in one hit, even if you have full health, so you don’t want to screw up! Most fights require you to either use the environments to your advantage, such as when you fight the spider lady, which forces you to use fire against her. Others are more typical fights where you dodge and shoot. Whatever you do, you can expect to die at least a few times, and have an utter blast doing so.
  • The audio visual package is fantastic. I already touched upon how great the tension and atmosphere are, but the graphics and audio go the extra mile and deserve to be singled out. The environments vary quite significantly from a stunningly detailed forest, to a crumbling church, to well…something else entirely. Lighting is superb, especially with the great fire effects. During the night you can see fog in the distance, there are stars twinkling far off in the sky, and there are so many gruesome and disturbing elements from disfigured faces of clowns just hanging on the wall, to bodies ripped apart everywhere. It’s disgustingly beautiful. Audio is used sparingly so as only to give you hints of the trouble ahead, but therein lies the genius. You’ll always hear enemies mumbling, you’ll hear footsteps and other ambient noises, and when trouble comes, the music picks up to keep your adrenaline rushing.

The So-So:

+/- Sadly what starts off kind of intriguing eventually becomes too convoluted for its own good. I found myself not even caring about the story whatsoever towards the end of the game. I just wanted to ‘make it out alive’ as it were. As for the story itself, players take on the role of Sebastian Castellanos, a detective sent in to investigate a series of gruesome murders at a local mental health hospital. From there things go bat-shit crazy as you experience one nightmarish scene after another. What brings the story down is that Sebastian just isn’t an interesting protagonist, and neither are the characters that surround him. I was intrigued to learn about the past residents of the asylum, but never truly cared, and given the constant jumps and flashback sequences, I didn’t feel any remorse over what happened to any of the supporting cast.

+/- The save system is a bit perplexing at times, and perfect at others. Let’s talk about the good first. There is a manual save system where you go back to the main ‘hub’ as I call it. From here you can upgrade your abilities, unlock lockers with the special tiny keys, and save your game. So that works fine, it’s the auto-save feature that leaves something to be desired. For the most part it works just fine, your progress will be saved after lengthy sections of the level, or after key fight scenes. However, there are times where it won’t save your game for what feels like an eternity and should you die, you’ll realize that it really was awhile, thereby forcing you to redo large sections of the level again. It’s bizarre.

+/- Load times aren’t too bad, until you start dying. Once you begin to have to restart over and over, you’ll notice time starts slowing down and load times get longer and longer. The reason for this is that the save system typically places your save directly before a cutscene. Yes you can skip cutscenes, but the fact that you have to go through the process of the cutscene and startup of the battle is what ultimately makes the load times feel longer than what they truly are.

The Bad:

  • There are some anomalies here and there. Some texture pop-in is present, minor clipping issues, and depending on the angle of the camera, shadows can get pixelated to the point they look like early PS2-rendered shadows. These moments don’t occur often, but they’re noticeable when they do.

The Lowdown:

The Evil Within feels like a direct continuation of Resident Evil 4. It shares a lot in common with that masterpiece. It’s tense, atmospheric, and has a great progression and combat system. While the story is mostly forgettable, and I never felt truly scared, overall the experience was an adrenaline ride of disturbing imagery, great survival horror gameplay, and that classic Shinji Mikami formula. If you enjoy more traditional survival horror games with a focus on surviving, The Evil Within won’t disappoint.

Final Score: 8.5/10

 

Alien: Isolation Review

Alien Isolation ReviewAlien: Isolation (Available on PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360 and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: M
Number of Players:
Genre: Survival Horror
Publisher: SEGA
Developer: The Creative Assembly
Release Date: October 7th, 2014

Parent Talk: Alien: Isolation has been rated M for mature because of blood, strong language, and violence. Have you ever seen the original Alien movie from 1979? If so, you can imagine why this game is rated M for mature. It’s dark, foreboding, and creepy. Children will be extremely frightened should they see, let alone play this game.

Plays Like: Imagine being locked on a massive space station with little to no weapons, and discovering you’re not alone. There’s a menacing alien creature on the loose that’s impervious to your attacks, and can kill you just as easily as you breathe. The only chance you have for survival is to hide in lockers, under desks, and use a motion tracker to be one-hundred percent sure the alien is nowhere near you as you make your way from one objective to the next. That’s Alien: Isolation, it’s just you and the alien, the problem is you’re the one who’s being hunted. Can you make it out alive?

Review Basis: SEGA sent us a review copy of the PlayStation 4 version of the game. I completed the main campaign and tried the included DLC.

Let’s get something out in the open right now, Aliens: Colonial Marines was not well received. I’ve yet to meet anyone that thought it did the Alien franchise justice. It had potential, but through misguided direction the game never lived up to the hype…quite literally. Enter The Creative Assembly and their take on the Alien universe. This one is much more grounded, and features some truly memorable scares. It is the closest we’ve ever gotten to playing in the Alien universe as imagined by Ridley Scott in the 1979 classic, Alien. It’s pulse pounding, horrifying, and will leave you on the edge of your seat for the duration of the game. Now that’s what Alien was all about.

Guess who's coming to dinner?
Guess who’s coming to dinner?

The Great:

Alien come to life. The developer absolutely nailed the look and feel of the 1979 film. You take on the role of Ellen Ripley’s daughter, Amanda who is looking for information about her missing mother. If you’ve seen the Ridley Scott directed film, you know exactly what happened to Ripley onboard the USCSS Nostromo. Amanda arrives on the space station Sevastopol, only to discover the place is in ruins. There is no one around, and it looks like a serious battle look place. There are holes in walls, the power is out all over the station, and you can feel in the air that something’s just not right. When you finally do stumble onto a survivor, they’re not exactly the nicest person in the world. What you discover is that everyone who is left on the station is fighting for their own survival and that some nasty monster has been picking them off one at a time. From there a giant game of cat and mouse ensues as you try ever so hopelessly to seek the information you’ve come here for, and get out alive. It’s in these moments where the game truly shines. You’ll peak around corners, use a motion tracker to ensure you’re alone, and use the environment to your advantage as you slowly make your way through each narrow corridor. To say the game feels just like the original Alien movie during these moments is an understatement, you’re living the movie and it’s just incredible.

Creepy access tunnels like this one are littered everywhere in the game.
Creepy access tunnels like this one are littered everywhere in the game.

The Good:

  • Fight or flight. This instinct-based gameplay is one of the best features of the game. Imagine you’re scouring around an office, and you suddenly hear something in the ventilation duct. You only have two choices available to you, do you stand and fight, or do you run away and give up your position? If you fight, you only have access to a few side arms which don’t really do anything to the xenomorph, or you could use your flamethrower and convince the menace to back down for a few seconds. Your other option is to run away. While that might seem like the best option, doing so will allow the Alien to pinpoint exactly where you are, making your chances of survival near zero. So ultimately do you have any choice at all? Maybe you should just stay right where you are and see what happens, as the lights slowly flicker on and off.
  • While you make your way from one save spot to another, which grant you a very brief moment to breathe, you’ll stumble onto crafting supplies. Collect as many of these as you possibly can as they’re your only means of not only healing yourself, but distracting the xenomorph. You can create first-aid items, noise makers, flash bang grenades, and more. You have to locate a blueprint before you’re able to make said supplies, but it’s critical you do so or you’ll never make it out alive!

  • Unscripted Alien patterns ensure you’re always scared. You’ll always know when the xenomorph drops into the room or area you’re in thanks to your trusty motion tracking device, but you’ll never know where it’s going to go. Will it hop into a vent and crawl around in the ceiling or will it make a circular pattern around the room you’re in. Whatever it does, you have to move, you can’t stay in one spot for too long because eventually it will make its way to you. The ideal solution is for you to hide for a bit, let it walk into another area, and slowly get your butt out of dodge.

  • The motion tracker also serves another purpose, it tells you where you need to go. Since you can use the tracker from virtually any position you’re in, you’ll be looking at it quite frequently during your stay onboard the Sevastopol.

  • There’s more to Alien Isolation than just hiding behind furniture and running from a xenomorph. There are areas you can’t access until you find a way to remove large locks from doors, little terminals you can need hack in order to bypass power from security cameras to air purifiers, and evil androids out to get you. There’s a nice balance between the cat and mouse game with the alien, stealth sections with the androids, and surviving against human opponents.

  • The audio is fantastic. From the limited music that plays during adrenaline-pumping moments, to all the ambient noises that constantly linger in the background, it’s all amazing. You’ll want to play with a quality surround sound system to get the most out of the audio, or a really good headset. Whatever you do, prepare to get fully immersed in this fantastic game world.

The most useful item in the game is the motion tracker.  Use it well!
The most useful item in the game is the motion tracker. Use it well!

The So-So:

+/- The graphics can be a bit of a mixed bag at times. On one hand the xenomorph looks fantastic, and the environments are gorgeous. There’s volumetric fog, incredible lighting, and the attention to detail in the space station is amazing. Sadly some of the human character models don’t look quite as good. The finer details in the face, for example, just aren’t there. I also noticed on a few occasions where the game would drop frame rate during cut scenes for whatever reason.

+/- Alien: Isolation is a fantastic game, but after the ten hour mark it starts to run a little thin. The story appears to be wrapping up on several occasions, only to be forcibly prolonged. I found this hurt the pacing towards the end of the game, but it remained fun throughout.

The Bad:

-False instructions. One of my biggest gripes with the game happens early on in the adventure. You’ll get a radio communication telling you to race towards the next area. Doing so will guarantee death, as the Alien is waiting for you just ahead. Why does the game to do this? If you take your time and do what you’ve been doing since the beginning of the game you’ll be just fine, but actually listening to what you’ve been told will cause you to die constantly.

Someone wants to say hello.
Someone wants to say hello.

The Lowdown:

Alien: Isolation is the best Alien game to come along in years, and it might very well be the best Alien game ever made. It captures the essence of the 1979 movie perfectly, and the feeling of dread you get from being locked in an area with the menacing Alien is unmatched in any other videogame I’ve played before. It might not hit all the right notes, but when the pieces all come together Alien: Isolation is one of the creepiest games I’ve ever played, and it also happens to be one of the very best games I’ve played in 2014.

Final Score: 9/10

Destiny Beta Week Part 8 – Welcome to the Moon & Goobye Beta

This is it, the final episode in our Destiny Beta Week special feature.  Jarrod and Steven hit up the moon, and say goodbye to the Destiny Beta.

Destiny Beta Week Part 7 – A Look at PvP

I promised you a look at the PvP portion of the Destiny Beta, and well, here it is. There are some really classic moments in this capture the zone game, that I hope you enjoy watching. I’ve got one more video on the Destiny Beta that will be up within the next few days, and that will wrap up our content for this game until it officially retails on September 9th, 2014.

Destiny Beta Week Part 6 – All Good Things Come to an End

This is it, the final video from the PvE portion of the Destiny Beta.  I’ll have one more video highlighting the PvP portion, and then that’s it until the final review in September.  Thank you very much for watching this in-depth look at the Destiny Beta.

Destiny Beta Week Part 2 – Taking a Walk in the Tower

The Tower of the Guardians is the place where you’ll meet new players, check your mail, store your additional gear, and much more.

E3 2014 Press Conference Impressions

Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo all held press conferences in LA…well ok Nintendo held a digital event, but whatever.  The point is that tons of new games were revealed, and we now have a much better idea what to expect from the next 12 months for each of the big three console manufacturers.  Here are my reactions to the press events.

Microsoft Press Conference:

Sony Press Conference:

Nintendo Digital Event:

What are your thoughts on the big three?

R-Type Dimensions Review

RT1R-Type Dimensions (Available on PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360)
ESRB Rating: E
Number of Players: 1 to 2
Genre: Shoot ‘em up
Publisher: Tozai, IREM
Developer: Southend Interactive
Release Date: May 20th, 2014

Parent Talk: R-Type Dimensions is rated E for everyone by the ESRB, and it’s a fitting rating. Neither R-Type nor R-Type II are overly violent by today’s standards. The games are entirely sprite-based, and colorful. There’s virtually nothing children should find frightening about an old arcade shmup, except for the difficulty.

Plays Like: Both games in this compilation play as you’d expect from the legendary series. You pilot the infamous Arrowhead and try to take out and alien life form. You have control over a force pod which can be thrown out in front of the ship to offer extra protection or firepower. It can also be attached to the rear of the ship. There are a wide assortment of power-ups and weapons, and the famous charge-shot. There’s one thing everyone needs to know about ­R-Type, it remains one of the most difficult videogames ever created, usually only offering one way to complete each stage.

Review Basis: Played through the Xbox Live Arcade version, and the PSN version.

If you don’t know what R-Type is, chances are high you don’t play many shmups, or are simply not a fan of the genre. The series remains legendary because of its extreme hardcore difficulty, and has become synonymous with quality gameplay. This compilation is a testament to both of those facts. Originally being released on Xbox Live Arcade back in 2009, Southend Interactive has just released this bad boy on the PlayStation Network so let’s dig a little deeper and find out what makes R-Type Dimensions tick.

RT1 The Great:

This reworking of the first two R-Type games is an incredible value. For only $10 you get the two original arcade ports, plus a complete reworking of the two games. This includes an entirely new 3D overhaul and an entirely new audio soundtrack, based on the original tracks of course. To make things even more interesting you can switch back and forth from the originals to the remastered version whenever you want with a simple press of a button. There’s even a ‘slow mo’ button for when the action really heats up and you want to take a little breather. This makes the two legendary arcade games much more approachable to newcomers who would otherwise be put off by the immense difficulty.

RT2The Good:

+ Accessibility is important, and Southend Interactive, the developer behind this compilation title realized that. Not only can you select to play through the original games in ‘Classic Mode’ with only a handful of lives and having to restart a level upon death, or a new mode which grants infinite lives and the ability to restart exactly where you perished from. If you actually want to complete both games, this is pretty much the only mode you’re likely going to succeed at doing that.

+ Core gameplay has aged perfectly. You have a charge shot, which is extremely powerful, but takes time to charge up, a wide assortment of power-ups such as missiles and different laser cannons and more. The biggest innovation upon its original release was the force pod. This orb-like pod can be attached to either the front or back of your ship, and can be shot out to attack enemies further away from your ship. It also acts as a very important shield.

+ Insanely high difficulty remains in check. The infinite lives mode is likely how most will play through the game, but if you really want a challenge, play through the Classic Mode. It forces you to figure out the one way through each of the levels, and believe me, it’ll take years of practice.

+ The very best way to experience R-Type is with a buddy, and thankfully online and offline modes are supported. If you really have a pair of brass balls, you can actually activate hit detection between the two ships. It makes an already impossible shmup that much harder.

RT3The Bad:

– The only negative comment I can say about Dimensions is that if you only play through the infinite lives mode you can play through both games in about 45 minutes. $10 for 45 might be asking for a lot.

RT4The Lowdown:

The awesome ability to switch between the original arcade versions and the redux versions are absolutely superb. I can’t tell you how often I found myself flipping back and forth. While I love shooters myself, this one is extremely challenging unless you play on the infinite lives mode, but then there’s no challenge at all. Whether you purchase this one on Xbox Live Arcade or the PlayStation Network, it’s certainly a legendary shooter that’s worth checking out.

Final Score: 8/10  

Strider Review

StriderStrider (Available on PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: E10+
Number of Players: 1
Genre: Action
Publisher: Capcom
Developer: Double Helix Games & Capcom Osaka Studio
Release Date: February 18th, 2014
Price: $14.99

Parent Talk: The ESRB Rates Strider E10+, for all those over ten years old. The content warning is for mild language and blood, and fantasy violence. The violence is much like the 1989 arcade game, fast and frantic, without being realistic. While players are cutting down everything in their way, there is very little in the way of blood. I’d say that almost anyone could play this game given the mild tone.

Plays Like: Players take on the role of Strider Hiryu, a ninja assassin like no other. With his Cypher (wicked looking sword), he chops down absolutely everything in his path. Unlike the previous games in the series, which were primarily level-based, this new reimagining plays like a Metroidvania game, where new items unlock previously inaccessible areas. Thankfully the action remains completely 2D so longtime fans of the series should have a lot to look forward to here.

Review Basis: I played through the PlayStation 4 version of the game, and had a real blast doing so.

GRIN, the developer behind Bionic Commando Rearmed, was set to make a Strider reboot in 2009, but when the company went bankrupt those plans were obviously scrapped. What we didn’t know was that Capcom was very serious about remaking Strider, so much so that they hooked up with Double Helix Games, the developer of the excellent Killer Instinct remakefor the Xbox One. What’s interesting is that Double Helix has gone on record as saying they were heavily inspired by Shadow Complex, which is a fantastic game to take inspiration from. So how has this reboot turned out? Is it worth the $15 asking price?

Strider1The Great:

Above all else what I enjoyed most about Strider was the fact that it’s always fun to play. Did you enjoy the 2D Metroid series? Did you love Castlevania: Symphony of the Night or the other Metroidvania Castlevania games? Were you a fan of Shadow Complex and Guacamelee? If you answered yes to any of those questions, you will absolutely adore Strider. By infusing rich and classic arcade action with Metroidvania-style gameplay, Strider has reached new levels of awesome. Not only do you get more powerful by finding new Cypher enhancements, but if you explore enough you can also find energy tanks, which allow you to use your option attacks more frequently. There are also rejuvenation and health tanks to find as well. Eventually Strider will be the ultimate bad ass, able to reflect enemy projectiles, call forth three option attacks (panther, droid, and hawk), and scale even the largest obstacle.

Strider2The Good:

+ Superb controls. At no point does Strider ever feel loose, which is important as he scales the side of a building or comes sliding through an open grate. He’s always responsive, and pulling off a dazzling array of special attacks is only a few button presses away.

+ The Cypher can now be upgraded. As you progress Strider will learn the ability to freeze his enemies, repel incoming projectiles and so much more. What I thoroughly enjoyed was that Strider’s famous scarf, or in this version his plasma trail, will turn a different color based on which Cypher you have equipped. It’s a nice touch.

+ Color system works great for both combat. Certain enemies will have yellow, red, or purples shields, which tells you which Cypher you need to switch to in order to take them down. Certain enemies are only weak to one Cypher, and switching back and forth is done by a simply tap of the d-pad.

+ Classic Metroid-inspiredmap system. The map is extremely detailed, allowing you to see where upgrades are located, which Cypher is required to open colored doors, etc.

+ Unlockable extra modes are a blast to play through. These might include racing through certain areas as quickly as possible, or sometimes something a little more violent.

+ The perfect download title. Weighing in at around six hours or so, give or take based on how much you explore, Strider is a wonderful reimagining of an arcade classic.

+ Excellent graphics. The game may take place in one giant environment, but the characters, animation, and level of detail is excellent for a digital-only release. Strider himself looks fantastic, and while I would have liked to have seen a little more color, I like how Strider and the bosses contrast so well with the backgrounds.

+ The soundtrack and sound effects are also very impressive. The music can be rip-roaring when the action cranks up, and the Cypher sounds as powerful as it should as you swing it around in front of you. The voice acting is fairly decent, although a few characters are a little cringe-worthy.

Strider3The So-So:

+/- There are some repeated level design elements that can make exploration a little off-putting because you might think you’re in one area, when you’re actually somewhere completely different. A little more variety in the environments would have been appreciated.

Strider4The Lowdown:

If you’ve got $15 and are looking for a great way to spend some time over the weekend, look no further than Strider. It’s an excellent reboot which should appeal to longtime fans and newcomers alike. The nice mix between action and exploration feels like a natural fit for the series, and I can only hope this is only the beginning of a brand new series of Strider games. Go download this one right now!

Final Score: 8.8/10