Tag Archives: PS3

Disney Infinity 3.0 Review

Disney Infinity 3.0 ReviewDisney Infinity 3.0 (Available on PS3, PS4, Wii U, Xbox 360, and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: E10+
Number of Players: 1 to 4
Genre: Action
Publisher: Disney Interactive Studios
Developer: Avalanche Software
Release Date: August 28th, 2015

Parent Talk: The ESRB rates Disney Infinity 3.0 E10+, or everyone over ten years old. They only site cartoon violence as a potential hazard, and to be honest, that’s absolutely right. Even young kids under 10 shouldn’t have much trouble with the game in terms of content, more so they’ll need an adult’s help in setting up the game and creating some of the content.

Plays Like: If you’ve played any of the Infinity games you should know the drill by now. You purchase the starter set that includes a few figures and the power base, plus a play set. That activates a certain amount of content on the disc. Typically it unlocks one story mode for the included characters. You also get the toy box which is where you can use every figure from across all three games. It’s where you build levels, customize your house and much, much more. If you want to experience more stories or figures, those are all sold separately. The non-user generated content plays out like any other children’s action game where you have limited moves, and make your way through linear stages.

Review Basis: Disney Interactive sent us a review copy for the PlayStation 4.

Disney Infinity has been my go-to series for the toy-to-game genre. Skylanders may have started the trend, and Nintendo is sure making a mint off those Amiibos, but it’s Disney Infinity that seems to have struck the perfect balance between a limited amount of figures, and a very entertaining videogame. This is by far the best version yet, and considering how many figures have been released across all three games, you sure have a lot of options for your toy box.

DI3_2The Great:

Disney characters, check, Marvel characters, double check, and now Star Wars characters, triple check! That is an incredible wealth of content, and for the very first time all three universes have come together in one package. There is something here for children of all ages. Whether you want to spend countless hours in the intimidating, but ultimately enjoyable toy box mode where you can use any figure you’ve collected over the years in a mix mash of games, genres, or anything else your brain can think of; or work your way through one of the many play sets, Disney Infinity 3.0 is a sheer delight. It’s the incredible wealth of content that is by far the single best feature of this game.

DI3_4The Good:

  • This year’s starter set features Ahsoka and Anakin figures, and the play set Twilight of the Republic, which is hands down the absolute best play set included in any of the previous starter sets. While you may note that’s one figure less than the previous starter sets, keep in mind that the price has been lowered. It’s also possible to use the power base from Disney Infinity 2.0 and simply download the game for an even greater cost reduction. That way you can simply pick-up the figures individually.
  • As always the build quality of the figures is top notch. That classic cartoony look the toys have fits the Star Wars universe perfectly. I will admit that excited children might snap off those thin lightsabers though, so parents be warned.
  • Combat is tighter and more refined than ever before. Experienced players will be able to time their button presses to string together a wide assortment of awesome looking combos, but for the kids, button mashing also leads to some rather awesome results. This is a perfect balance for seasoned and newbie players alike.

DI3_1+ The Star Wars property is respected and put to good use. You can explore four planets, take part in space dog fights, and much more. I was surprised by just how fantastic the overall gameplay was.

  • The toy box mode is now easier than ever before. It’s incredible what you can do in this mode, make a Star Wars-inspired Mario Kart, or anything else you can dream of. Previously actually making these mini-games was daunting, but now, thanks to the new tools, I found it much easier to whip up something enjoyable. That said, it is still quite overwhelming at first glance. If building your own levels and games isn’t your thing, that’s ok, you can easily play through the hundreds of user created levels.
  • The audio visual presentation is absolutely top notch. This feels, looks, and sounds like a Star Wars game. The developers didn’t skip a beat, and it shows.

DI3_3The So-So:

+/- Every year it’s the same thing, but ultimately your enjoyment of Disney Infinity 3.0 will greatly depend on how much money you throw at it. If you purchase the additional characters and play sets, naturally you’ll have a much deeper experience than someone who only purchases the starter set. I would strongly recommend if you’re going to buy this for children, pick up at least one or two additional figures and another play set.

DI3_5The Lowdown:

Disney Infinity 3.0 is a fantastic game. While it may appear to be a more expensive affair this time around because of the reduced figure count, you’re actually getting more bang for your buck. While I absolutely loved last year’s iteration, this year’s blows it out of the water. The Star Wars property is handled with respect and admiration and it shows. This is an absolute gem for kids, so if you have some, I strongly recommend you put this bad boy under the Christmas tree.

Final Score: 8.5/10

Alien: Isolation Review

Alien Isolation ReviewAlien: Isolation (Available on PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360 and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: M
Number of Players:
Genre: Survival Horror
Publisher: SEGA
Developer: The Creative Assembly
Release Date: October 7th, 2014

Parent Talk: Alien: Isolation has been rated M for mature because of blood, strong language, and violence. Have you ever seen the original Alien movie from 1979? If so, you can imagine why this game is rated M for mature. It’s dark, foreboding, and creepy. Children will be extremely frightened should they see, let alone play this game.

Plays Like: Imagine being locked on a massive space station with little to no weapons, and discovering you’re not alone. There’s a menacing alien creature on the loose that’s impervious to your attacks, and can kill you just as easily as you breathe. The only chance you have for survival is to hide in lockers, under desks, and use a motion tracker to be one-hundred percent sure the alien is nowhere near you as you make your way from one objective to the next. That’s Alien: Isolation, it’s just you and the alien, the problem is you’re the one who’s being hunted. Can you make it out alive?

Review Basis: SEGA sent us a review copy of the PlayStation 4 version of the game. I completed the main campaign and tried the included DLC.

Let’s get something out in the open right now, Aliens: Colonial Marines was not well received. I’ve yet to meet anyone that thought it did the Alien franchise justice. It had potential, but through misguided direction the game never lived up to the hype…quite literally. Enter The Creative Assembly and their take on the Alien universe. This one is much more grounded, and features some truly memorable scares. It is the closest we’ve ever gotten to playing in the Alien universe as imagined by Ridley Scott in the 1979 classic, Alien. It’s pulse pounding, horrifying, and will leave you on the edge of your seat for the duration of the game. Now that’s what Alien was all about.

Guess who's coming to dinner?
Guess who’s coming to dinner?

The Great:

Alien come to life. The developer absolutely nailed the look and feel of the 1979 film. You take on the role of Ellen Ripley’s daughter, Amanda who is looking for information about her missing mother. If you’ve seen the Ridley Scott directed film, you know exactly what happened to Ripley onboard the USCSS Nostromo. Amanda arrives on the space station Sevastopol, only to discover the place is in ruins. There is no one around, and it looks like a serious battle look place. There are holes in walls, the power is out all over the station, and you can feel in the air that something’s just not right. When you finally do stumble onto a survivor, they’re not exactly the nicest person in the world. What you discover is that everyone who is left on the station is fighting for their own survival and that some nasty monster has been picking them off one at a time. From there a giant game of cat and mouse ensues as you try ever so hopelessly to seek the information you’ve come here for, and get out alive. It’s in these moments where the game truly shines. You’ll peak around corners, use a motion tracker to ensure you’re alone, and use the environment to your advantage as you slowly make your way through each narrow corridor. To say the game feels just like the original Alien movie during these moments is an understatement, you’re living the movie and it’s just incredible.

Creepy access tunnels like this one are littered everywhere in the game.
Creepy access tunnels like this one are littered everywhere in the game.

The Good:

  • Fight or flight. This instinct-based gameplay is one of the best features of the game. Imagine you’re scouring around an office, and you suddenly hear something in the ventilation duct. You only have two choices available to you, do you stand and fight, or do you run away and give up your position? If you fight, you only have access to a few side arms which don’t really do anything to the xenomorph, or you could use your flamethrower and convince the menace to back down for a few seconds. Your other option is to run away. While that might seem like the best option, doing so will allow the Alien to pinpoint exactly where you are, making your chances of survival near zero. So ultimately do you have any choice at all? Maybe you should just stay right where you are and see what happens, as the lights slowly flicker on and off.
  • While you make your way from one save spot to another, which grant you a very brief moment to breathe, you’ll stumble onto crafting supplies. Collect as many of these as you possibly can as they’re your only means of not only healing yourself, but distracting the xenomorph. You can create first-aid items, noise makers, flash bang grenades, and more. You have to locate a blueprint before you’re able to make said supplies, but it’s critical you do so or you’ll never make it out alive!

  • Unscripted Alien patterns ensure you’re always scared. You’ll always know when the xenomorph drops into the room or area you’re in thanks to your trusty motion tracking device, but you’ll never know where it’s going to go. Will it hop into a vent and crawl around in the ceiling or will it make a circular pattern around the room you’re in. Whatever it does, you have to move, you can’t stay in one spot for too long because eventually it will make its way to you. The ideal solution is for you to hide for a bit, let it walk into another area, and slowly get your butt out of dodge.

  • The motion tracker also serves another purpose, it tells you where you need to go. Since you can use the tracker from virtually any position you’re in, you’ll be looking at it quite frequently during your stay onboard the Sevastopol.

  • There’s more to Alien Isolation than just hiding behind furniture and running from a xenomorph. There are areas you can’t access until you find a way to remove large locks from doors, little terminals you can need hack in order to bypass power from security cameras to air purifiers, and evil androids out to get you. There’s a nice balance between the cat and mouse game with the alien, stealth sections with the androids, and surviving against human opponents.

  • The audio is fantastic. From the limited music that plays during adrenaline-pumping moments, to all the ambient noises that constantly linger in the background, it’s all amazing. You’ll want to play with a quality surround sound system to get the most out of the audio, or a really good headset. Whatever you do, prepare to get fully immersed in this fantastic game world.

The most useful item in the game is the motion tracker.  Use it well!
The most useful item in the game is the motion tracker. Use it well!

The So-So:

+/- The graphics can be a bit of a mixed bag at times. On one hand the xenomorph looks fantastic, and the environments are gorgeous. There’s volumetric fog, incredible lighting, and the attention to detail in the space station is amazing. Sadly some of the human character models don’t look quite as good. The finer details in the face, for example, just aren’t there. I also noticed on a few occasions where the game would drop frame rate during cut scenes for whatever reason.

+/- Alien: Isolation is a fantastic game, but after the ten hour mark it starts to run a little thin. The story appears to be wrapping up on several occasions, only to be forcibly prolonged. I found this hurt the pacing towards the end of the game, but it remained fun throughout.

The Bad:

-False instructions. One of my biggest gripes with the game happens early on in the adventure. You’ll get a radio communication telling you to race towards the next area. Doing so will guarantee death, as the Alien is waiting for you just ahead. Why does the game to do this? If you take your time and do what you’ve been doing since the beginning of the game you’ll be just fine, but actually listening to what you’ve been told will cause you to die constantly.

Someone wants to say hello.
Someone wants to say hello.

The Lowdown:

Alien: Isolation is the best Alien game to come along in years, and it might very well be the best Alien game ever made. It captures the essence of the 1979 movie perfectly, and the feeling of dread you get from being locked in an area with the menacing Alien is unmatched in any other videogame I’ve played before. It might not hit all the right notes, but when the pieces all come together Alien: Isolation is one of the creepiest games I’ve ever played, and it also happens to be one of the very best games I’ve played in 2014.

Final Score: 9/10

Destiny Beta Week Part 8 – Welcome to the Moon & Goobye Beta

This is it, the final episode in our Destiny Beta Week special feature.  Jarrod and Steven hit up the moon, and say goodbye to the Destiny Beta.

Destiny Beta Week Part 7 – A Look at PvP

I promised you a look at the PvP portion of the Destiny Beta, and well, here it is. There are some really classic moments in this capture the zone game, that I hope you enjoy watching. I’ve got one more video on the Destiny Beta that will be up within the next few days, and that will wrap up our content for this game until it officially retails on September 9th, 2014.

Destiny Beta Week Part 6 – All Good Things Come to an End

This is it, the final video from the PvE portion of the Destiny Beta.  I’ll have one more video highlighting the PvP portion, and then that’s it until the final review in September.  Thank you very much for watching this in-depth look at the Destiny Beta.

Destiny Beta Week Part 2 – Taking a Walk in the Tower

The Tower of the Guardians is the place where you’ll meet new players, check your mail, store your additional gear, and much more.

Watch Dogs Review

Watch DogsWatch Dogs (Available on PC, PS3, PS4, Wii U, Xbox 360, and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: M
Number of Players: 1 to 8
Genre: Action
Publisher: Ubisoft
Developer: Ubisoft Montreal
Release Date: May 27th, 2014

Parent Talk: Watch Dogs is rated M for mature because of blood, intense violence, nudity, strong language, strong sexual content, and the use of drugs and alcohol. If you’ve ever played an open world game in the vein of Grand Theft Auto or Saint’s Row, you know what to expect in terms of sheer violence and brutality. There are also some intense scenes such as people being sold off to the sex trade and much, much more.

Plays Like: While Watch Dogs shares a lot in comment with other open world games in that you drive around a massive city, take on missions to progress the story, and take part in hundreds of short side quests, or mini-games. What makes Watch Dogs unique is that it features a hacking mechanic that feels completely different than virtually any other open world game out there. You can spy on anyone by taking over a security camera, you can cause traffic lights to spontaneously switch colors causing a massive traffic jam, and much more. Aiden is no push-over either, and he’s well-armed with all the usual firearms you’d expect from a game like this.

Review Basis: Ubisoft sent over the PlayStation 4 version for us to review.  I played many online sessions, and completed the single player campaign.

Watch Dogs has been hyped as the next great videogame franchise for the past few years. It has been eagerly anticipated by millions of gamers around the world, and now the time has come to pass judgment. Does Watch Dogs live up to the hype, or is it just another in a long line of open world action games?

Watch Dogs1The Great:

In typical open world fashion, you take on missions in order to progress the story. Interestingly enough, the story is linear, and each act is broken down into one mission after another. You don’t go see either Cousin Vinnie, Bob, or Sue for a mission, and someone else for another. No, instead the core focus is on a very linear storyline, but how you tackle the missions is what makes Watch Dogs stand out. Normally you’d just run into a building, guns blazing and then you’d be challenged with escaping the madness afterwards. While that basic setup is more or less the same here, Aiden, the protagonist, has the ability to hack into a nice assortment of objects. He can hack security cameras, which allow you to see where enemies are, he can overload an enemy’s cellphone which causes it to explode, he can overload circuit breakers, and much more. This changes the way you approach each encounter, because while it’s certainly true you could just run in guns blazing, it’s so much more enjoyable taking your enemies out from the shadows using nothing but your hacking skills and a couple of smart distractions.

Watch Dogs2The Good:

+ Fantastic cast of characters. One of my favorite aspects of Watch Dogs is the great casts of supporting characters. I never really connected on a personal level with Aiden, but the rest of the cast was great. Clara in particular is an extremely important, and interesting character.

+ The side missions, and optional content are all extremely fun to play. If you enjoy open world games, you’re going to enjoy this one. Simple as that. From blasting aliens in augmented reality mini-games, to the wide assortment of side missions like preventing people from being robbed, to delivering cars to specific spots with little or no damage, to anything else you can think of, the action remains fun and enjoyable.

+ I also really loved how the online portion of the game is seamlessly connected to the single player experience. Frequently you’ll be updated about some sort of online event taking place from races to decryption matches and more. There are several online game modes available, and they’re all a blast.

+ I also have to mention the digital trip mini-games. I don’t want to spoil them as there are only four, but these offer some of the most fun you’ll have in the entire game. They’re wacky, but so, so awesome.

+ The simple level system allows Aiden to become a better hacker, driver, and a more proficient killing machine. Everything you do in the game nets you experience and all the various mini-games, and side quests, including online sessions, will reward special cars, weapons, and skills. I love how no matter what you do, you always feel like you’re making progress.

+ Watch Dogs is a very impressive game to look at, and to listen to. From lush environments, great water effects, and a wide assortment of catchy musical tracks, there’s something here for audio visual fans to dig their teeth into. I also really appreciated how destroyable some of the environments are.

Watch Dogs3The So-So:

+/- The story never reaches its full potential. Aiden is seeking revenge for the death of his niece, but when his sister begs him to stop because he’s putting the rest of his family in jeopardy, he essentially ignores her pleas and continues, even though she’s absolutely right. I was never really satisfied with the explanation the game gave for why Aiden was so persistent, and I found it hurt his overall character as a result.

+/- While Aiden does get more interesting later on in the game, I found it a bit too late by that time. Here we have a person who is essentially killing hundreds, if not thousands of people for one little girl. Is that truly revenge?

+/- Being able to use your profiler, or cellphone to see what every single NPC does for a living, how much they make, and more, acts like a moral compass of sorts. Will you shoot an enemy if you know that they’re only doing this job because they need the money for their sick mother? What about the guy who’s expecting a newborn any day now? I loved that the game made me react differently to each new situation, however there was no real consequence for killing one NPC and saving another. I appreciated what Ubisoft tried to do here, but it felt only half fulfilling.

Watch Dogs4The Bad:

– While everything comes together beautifully in Watch Dogs, the game does suffer from a few issues. The first being the shopping system is completely pointless. During my entire time with the game I never once bought anything from the various stores that I wasn’t forced to, because there was simply no need. I never ran out of ammo, never had a need for a sports car, etc. Everything I needed the game gave me, making the shopping experience useless.

– As with virtually all open world games, eventually the world starts to feel a bit repetitive. While I love fast traveling to safe spots, the core breakdown is almost always the same. Drive somewhere, shoot people, hack something, drive somewhere else. There is a ton of mission variety, but that feeling that you’re doing something similar is always present.

Watch Dogs5The Lowdown:

Watch Dogs is a very fun game to play, but it didn’t wow me as much as I thought it would. Perhaps it’s because the hacking system is simply a single button press, maybe it’s because there are so many high quality open world games out there, or perhaps I’m simply tiring of the genre. Whatever the case may be, I enjoyed my time with Watch Dogs and I can easily recommend this one to fans of the genre looking for something a bit different. Ultimately though, I’d say this is a very good game, just not overly great.

Final Score: 8/10

R-Type Dimensions Review

RT1R-Type Dimensions (Available on PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360)
ESRB Rating: E
Number of Players: 1 to 2
Genre: Shoot ‘em up
Publisher: Tozai, IREM
Developer: Southend Interactive
Release Date: May 20th, 2014

Parent Talk: R-Type Dimensions is rated E for everyone by the ESRB, and it’s a fitting rating. Neither R-Type nor R-Type II are overly violent by today’s standards. The games are entirely sprite-based, and colorful. There’s virtually nothing children should find frightening about an old arcade shmup, except for the difficulty.

Plays Like: Both games in this compilation play as you’d expect from the legendary series. You pilot the infamous Arrowhead and try to take out and alien life form. You have control over a force pod which can be thrown out in front of the ship to offer extra protection or firepower. It can also be attached to the rear of the ship. There are a wide assortment of power-ups and weapons, and the famous charge-shot. There’s one thing everyone needs to know about ­R-Type, it remains one of the most difficult videogames ever created, usually only offering one way to complete each stage.

Review Basis: Played through the Xbox Live Arcade version, and the PSN version.

If you don’t know what R-Type is, chances are high you don’t play many shmups, or are simply not a fan of the genre. The series remains legendary because of its extreme hardcore difficulty, and has become synonymous with quality gameplay. This compilation is a testament to both of those facts. Originally being released on Xbox Live Arcade back in 2009, Southend Interactive has just released this bad boy on the PlayStation Network so let’s dig a little deeper and find out what makes R-Type Dimensions tick.

RT1 The Great:

This reworking of the first two R-Type games is an incredible value. For only $10 you get the two original arcade ports, plus a complete reworking of the two games. This includes an entirely new 3D overhaul and an entirely new audio soundtrack, based on the original tracks of course. To make things even more interesting you can switch back and forth from the originals to the remastered version whenever you want with a simple press of a button. There’s even a ‘slow mo’ button for when the action really heats up and you want to take a little breather. This makes the two legendary arcade games much more approachable to newcomers who would otherwise be put off by the immense difficulty.

RT2The Good:

+ Accessibility is important, and Southend Interactive, the developer behind this compilation title realized that. Not only can you select to play through the original games in ‘Classic Mode’ with only a handful of lives and having to restart a level upon death, or a new mode which grants infinite lives and the ability to restart exactly where you perished from. If you actually want to complete both games, this is pretty much the only mode you’re likely going to succeed at doing that.

+ Core gameplay has aged perfectly. You have a charge shot, which is extremely powerful, but takes time to charge up, a wide assortment of power-ups such as missiles and different laser cannons and more. The biggest innovation upon its original release was the force pod. This orb-like pod can be attached to either the front or back of your ship, and can be shot out to attack enemies further away from your ship. It also acts as a very important shield.

+ Insanely high difficulty remains in check. The infinite lives mode is likely how most will play through the game, but if you really want a challenge, play through the Classic Mode. It forces you to figure out the one way through each of the levels, and believe me, it’ll take years of practice.

+ The very best way to experience R-Type is with a buddy, and thankfully online and offline modes are supported. If you really have a pair of brass balls, you can actually activate hit detection between the two ships. It makes an already impossible shmup that much harder.

RT3The Bad:

– The only negative comment I can say about Dimensions is that if you only play through the infinite lives mode you can play through both games in about 45 minutes. $10 for 45 might be asking for a lot.

RT4The Lowdown:

The awesome ability to switch between the original arcade versions and the redux versions are absolutely superb. I can’t tell you how often I found myself flipping back and forth. While I love shooters myself, this one is extremely challenging unless you play on the infinite lives mode, but then there’s no challenge at all. Whether you purchase this one on Xbox Live Arcade or the PlayStation Network, it’s certainly a legendary shooter that’s worth checking out.

Final Score: 8/10  

Child of Light Review

Child of Light ReviewChild of Light (Available on PC, PS3, PS4, Wii U, Xbox 360, and Xbox One)
ESRB Rating: E10+
Number of Players: 1 to 2
Genre: RPG
Publisher: Ubisoft
Developer: Ubisoft
Release Date: April 30th, 2014

Parent Talk: Child of Light is a beautiful RPG that features fairytale-like fantasy violence as well as the use of tobacco and alcohol, but again, in a whimsical sense. The entire game is told through the eyes of a young girl, and the backdrop is a painting world come to life. There is very little damaging with this game, however I do recommend parents heed the warning of the ESRB because very young children might be scared by some of the darker elements in the game.

Plays Like: Child of Light was designed from the ground up to be reminiscent of RPGs from the 16-bit console generation, however with modern sensibilities. That means there are no random encounters, but action is entirely turn-based. Everything is streamlined here from the basic inventory system, to the relatively simple battle system, however it all comes together in such a way that it proves there’s still a place for turn-based RPGs in today’s overly action RPG world.

Review Basis: Finished the PS4 version of the game.

If you’re looking for a beautiful game for any of the modern platforms from the PS3 to the Xbox One and Wii U, this is a game you should pay attention to. It features some of the liveliest settings I’ve seen in years, and the gameplay, while nostalgic, is extremely balanced and fun to play. It feels extremely rewarding when you time your attacks correctly and prevent a boss from attacking during the entire encounter.

CoL1The Great:

There are two distinct elements that really stand out in Child of Light, with the first being the incredible battle system. What makes it so unique is that it combines real-time elements and classic turn-based commands. At the bottom of the screen is an action bar which show icons for all the characters on the screen, typically two icons for the two heroes and three for the enemies. On the right side of the action bar is a red portion which is the command entry or cast build-up portion. The second your character’s icon hit the left portion of the red section you’re given your turn to enter your command. From there your character will prepare to attack, only doing so when their icon reaches the very end of the meter. The twist is that should you be attacked before your character gets their attack off, it acts as an interrupt and your icon gets blasted back to the left, therefore causing you to essentially lose a turn. What’s so great about this is that you can do the same to enemies as well, and even bosses. This adds an incredible amount of strategy to a deceivingly simple looking combat system.

Things get even more interesting when you include Igniculus, who is controlled with the right analog stick of a real-life coop partner. Igniculus can fly around the screen healing allies, or slowing down enemies, on top of picking up health and mana orbs from the environment. If that sounds like a lot to manage, keep in mind that this doesn’t even include the fact that you’ll be switching your party members almost every other turn later on in the game because each has unique abilities catered to a specific type of enemy.

The other fantastic element are the beautiful graphics. Imagine a hand painted piece of art come to life, and that’s what you get here. Child of Light was deeply inspired by Studio Ghibli and the spectacular art of Yoshitaka Amano. From the backdrops, to the enemy and level design, everything has been meticulously pieced together in such a way that you always feel like you’re playing within a child’s fairytale book and it’s wonderful. Each new area you explore looks dramatically different than the last, and yet they all fit together perfectly. It’s hard to describe in words just how incredible this game looks, and the feeling it will give you as you first step foot in the magically world of Lemuria.

CoL2The Good:

+ The story is quite unexpected as it features a young girl named Aurora trying to save her father, and not the other way around. Each new cast member you meet strikes off on their own, instead of following archaic archetypes from RPGs of old. As such you automatically feel connected to these characters as they all feel important and unique.

+ Incredible sense of style from not only the lush visual presentation, but also the way in which the dialogue has a deeply Shakespearian feel to it. This further enhances the game’s unique feel.

+ The soundtrack feels much like the visuals, organic. The melodies are bold when you’re in combat, and surreal when you’re running by a waterfall. I haven’t played a game where the soundtrack complemented the visuals like this in a very long time.

+ The simple inventory system allows you to easily get the most out of potions and special gems, which you can augment to your weapon, defense, and overall stats. These gems can even be combined through a very basic alchemy system. If you attach a blue gem to your weapon you’ll gain a water attack bonus on all enemies you attack through melee, and if you attach said gem to your defense you’ll gain a certain percentage of water elemental resistance. For the stat bonuses, they can range from increasing your HP and mana, to grant you a limit-break type attack and so much more.

+ Upon leveling up players can unlock one new skill in the level-up tree. Later on it will take two levels to unlock the most powerful abilities. What’s nice is that you always have at least three different directions you can select from on the tree. Typically one area will be most focused on magic attacks, one for melee attacks, and one for overall bonuses, but each character has a unique tree, and often there are skills from all three sets located within each branch. Another bonus is that your entire party gains experience even if they’re not in combat.

+ Igniculus isn’t just useful in battle situations, but also helps Aurora solve puzzles. He can light the way to secret caves, or helps her activate switches she otherwise would never be able to reach. In the end he feels like a true companion.

+ One of the biggest problems people have when they have a family, or begin their working career is a real lack of time to devote to playing videogames. Thankfully Child of Light is around 12 hours long, which is absolutely perfect because even if you can only devote 30 minutes a day, you’ll always feel like you’re making progress and before long you’ll see the end credits.

CoL3The Lowdown:

Child of Light is one of the year’s freshest and best RPGs. Don’t let it’s download-only moniker fool you, this is an incredible journey that’s well worth taking. The combat is balanced and extremely deep for appearing so simple. The graphics and soundtrack are absolutely fantastic, and the story is deeply personal. I don’t know what else I can say except, go give this one a download right away. It comes extremely highly recommended.

Final Score: 9.8/10